More Gratuitous Opera Porn

A couple of weeks back I illuminated the phrase “mille e tre” with a link to this cute little video riff on the “catalogue” kept by the manservant of the celebrated seducer Don Giovanni (Don Juan). You never quite get whether Leporello is uttering a word to the wise, warning the discarded Donna Elvira that his master is unstoppable in his trajectory of conquest and she had better just pull up her socks and cope, or if he’s rubbing her face in it. If the Don had an iPhone and mapping software, well:

I was humming it the other night after my excursion to Tosca and suddenly felt moved to surf YouTube for other good operatic horndog moments.

Tempo a little more leisurely than I like it, but Hong’s voice is as penetrating and flawlessly pitched as a glass harmonica, Bryn is Bryn, and oh god that bit with the apple.

(If you’re not familiar with the opera, the Don has taken the opportunity to chase skirt at a peasant wedding. She’s the bride.)

I should be more careful in this heat.

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15 thoughts on “More Gratuitous Opera Porn

  1. I’m stretching your theme a bit, but I love the way these three ladies try to seduce Schicchi to get their part of Buozo’s estate, and how he seduces all of them with Florence.

    • Ha!

      That was one of my ex husband’s dream roles — he was always the “little man who sings the patter song” in Savoy operas and could only fantasize about Schicci, whose tessatura was just a squeak too high.

      I’d say you’re still squarely on topic with all that ensemble coppafeelia there. Stephanie Blythe… yiiiiii.

    • I can just imagine you Weilling away the time.

      Salome. Which I don’t have the top notes for, but at least I wouldn’t have to sprechstimme the F sharp below middle C.

      Runner-up, Azucena.

      • I don’t have ANY of the notes, so I think you’ll do for Salome.

        Azucena: Trovatore, right? Sorry, I don’t know it at all. I actually had to google, ashamed to say. But I’m guessing you mean the Azucena from Trovatore and not the title character from a Venezuelan telenovela, though that might be fun too.

        You’re right, it’s Jenny Diver for me. Nice job. Yeah, but I’ve probably talked about her somewhere in the blogosphere before. She looms.

        I also like Rosina from Barber. Not so high brow, I know, but don’t you want to be able to move your voice all over the place like that?

        • The original Old Gypsy.

          On the lighter side, I have to confess to not knowing “Barber” at all well (I have some music video surfing to do, obviously). But now that you bring up Figaro, there’s Cherubino in “Nozze di Figaro” — I would never turn down any trouser role.

          I love the way Mozart’s melodic line supplied him with a teenage boy’s breaking voice. His balls drop about 2:47.

          • I love the Cherubino! Love it easily. As for the Verdi, it’s going to take some time. The truth is that it just takes me lots of listening to come to love a piece of operatic music. My husband has dabbled a bit in opera (he’s a stage director) and, for some operas, I have sat through lots of rehearsals–these are the ones I know and love.

            Barber is commonly produced, so I know it well. I know it’s a little cheap (for real sophisticates) but this piece is one of my favorite get-ready-for-court numbers:

          • I see what you mean about the vocal agility. And Garanca has such a delicious lower register. Now I am going to chase her around YouTube. Can’t find any recording of her as Salome… damn… that voice could totally sing das geheimnis der Liebe ist grosser als das Geheimnis des Todes (where most sopranos sound like they’re down at the bottom of a plumbing pipe).

            Sophisticates? Cheap? What kind of talk is that? I tend to the German and serious, but that’s taste and temperament, because I’m bitter and cynical.

            But I am not indifferent to lightness and humor. As proof here is a favorite Salome.

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